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William Shakespeare Gets Covid Vaccine

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Barry Nussbaum: Hello and welcome to ATP Report. It's the Katie and Barry show. Joining me from beautiful London, England this evening is Katie Hopkins. Hello, Katie.

Katie Hopkins: Hi, Barry. I'm not so sure about the beautiful, but it is very twinkly—lots of Christmas lights out and about.

Barry Nussbaum: Well, at least I haven't banned that yet. Let's talk about some other weird stuff in the U.K., though. What's going on with the first people to get the vaunted and highly celebrated COVID-19 vaccine?

I understand you've got a couple of old people, 90-year-old Margaret and some William Shakespeare character. The name sounds familiar. What's happened with the first vaccines?

Katie Hopkins: Yes. So, the U.K. has basically rushed ahead, got this vaccine and is kind of throwing it out the door. Whether it's ready or not. Of course, we have the staged images of a 90-year-old being wheeled in to get her vaccine. She said, "It's the best day of my life."

Now, if the best day of your life and you've reached the age of 90 is getting a vaccine, I'm going to say your life hasn't been as exciting as it might have been. The second thing is the other guy they shoved the vaccine in was called William Shakespeare. I just have some concerns.

I don't want to be a fearmonger, but if we kill off or Pfizer kills off William Shakespeare, that's not going to be a good look. So, they've thrown this vaccine out to people, and the headlines that followed shortly after that said two nurses in the NHS had a severe allergic reaction, and they had to use those epi-pens. Then came the headline, "Don't use the vaccine if you've got allergies." So already we see some not-so-great side effects.

Now, I'm not trying to be the doom monger. If people want to take this thing, take it. I think all I'm trying to say and advocate for is choice. So, I'm concerned that we're going to get to the point in the U.K. where we don't have a choice about whether we take this thing or not.

Barry Nussbaum: Well, before we get to that, wasn't there a case of facial paralysis or palsy in a number of people in the first trial group as well?

Katie Hopkins: Absolutely. So that trial, you're quite right, had two groups, obviously, the vaccine group and the placebo group. In the vaccine group, there were two deaths, which is alarming. In the placebo group, there were four deaths.

There were four instances of facial paralysis in the vaccine group, Bell's palsy, as it's called, and none in the placebo group. So that's alarming, and there is a history of vaccines for flu causing facial paralysis.

There were also instances of appendicitis, heart attacks, and strokes. So not only have there been some instances that don't look too favorable for the vaccine, but I also suppose the question is why is it being rolled out so quickly if there are things like these allergies that have not been identified?

I have been overwhelmed, Barry, with emails from doctors, nurses, ambulance people telling me they won't be having this. They know I'm speaking out. They are grateful. They have a voice, and they are telling me, I'm not taking this thing. I will leave the health service before I take it.

Barry Nussbaum: Well, years ago, a doctor treating my family had me read aloud the disclosure in the flu vaccine. This was a number of years ago. Every year in the United States, like around the world, they have a new vaccine trying to guess which flu is coming out of China that year.

The vaccine disclosure in very tiny print on about the 14th page said that something like 20 or 25 percent that get the vaccine get the flu from the vaccine. This flu is COVID-19 that we're all talking about and it is really bad. So, if taking the vaccine gives you a one in five chance of getting it, and there are all these other side effects in the first trial groups, like your face is paralyzed, you have appendicitis or a heart attack.

I'm thinking a lot of people are going to refuse it. You told me that there is a debate now in Parliament that the vaccine could be mandated. If you don't get it, bad things will happen to you, and or you'll be denied services in the U.K.

Katie Hopkins: Yes, absolutely. We have these petitions that if they get over a certain number, there is a debate in Parliament. Thanks to 335,000 thousand British people signing this petition, there is a debate in Parliament in a couple of days’ time.

That debate is about whether the government will start to do things to people if they refuse to have the vaccine? Will they take away our access to health care? Will they take away our access to schools? Of course, what we're hearing is those political phrases that you'll recognize. Which are there are no plans at present to introduce anything for people, but no plans at present, of course, can change tomorrow.

So, we're watching that debate. I've tried to get into the House of Commons to cover that in more detail for the ATP audience. I have been prohibited from entering the media pack to be able to listen to that debate. They're not allowing anyone in.

Barry Nussbaum: That's not surprising. So, in London proper, I understand is going into tier three, which is basically going to crush small businesses in the hospitality and hotel industry.

Katie Hopkins: I mean, so you guys know there are these crazy systems of lockdown, what stage of lockdown. Here they are trying to put London into the deepest, hardest, most restrictive of lockdowns. In order to do that, they've started the mass testing of our children.

So, children aged 11 and over are going to be tested in their schools. Do you know why this happens? Of course, it's because they will find those numbers. Those numbers will be enough for them to say, well, look at the numbers in these young people. Now we need to lock everything down. No going out, no restaurants, no bars, no nothing. I mean, very much the California model.

So, we're going into an increased lockdown at Christmas. France just announced no going out for New Year's. New Year's Eve in France, The City of Lights is a massive, massive event. I know New Year's is massive everywhere, but for Paris to already disclosed that there's no New Year's, I think London is actually going to follow that and do exactly the same. But Barry, as you know, at a local pub that won't be identified, there are still stories of hope and humanity that are carrying us through.

Barry Nussbaum: Before we get to your pub story, which is kind of delightful, why is the U.K. testing kids? The statistics worldwide are that almost no children get it. When I say almost no children, I mean one out of a couple hundred thousand.

Those numbers then become literally borderline zero of the death rates of kids. They don't get the disease, and if they do get it, they don't even know they have it. Even if they have it, they don't die from it. So why are we testing kids?

Katie Hopkins: Yeah, and to me, it smacks of sort of mining, if you will, coal mining. You wanted coal. You're going to go to the place you'll find coal. I think that's what they're doing now, here. They're going to colleges to get these numbers.

They need the numbers to be high. So, they're effectively mining places where they can achieve high numbers of COVID positive results. Even though for the children involved, it has no impact. It does not affect them, and there is no need at all to be shutting everything. I suppose the broader question, Barry, is why? Why do they want London to collapse into a dark hole?

Barry Nussbaum: You know, if I was going to be conspiratorial for a second to answer your question, I would simply say that when you create an unsolvable problem, and the government is the deliverer of the bad news, well, then people look to the government to solve their problem.

It becomes a demand for governmental institutions to expand their footprint. Once expanded, governments never contract. Once they get their hooks into a policy, a procedure, financing, the administration, the deep state just grows, and it only goes in one direction. Which is it gets bigger.

Katie Hopkins: Absolutely. The other thing I've observed all over the world, I suppose now, is the very richest are isolated from the impacts in the sense that typically they own their own homes. They're not going to be made homeless. They have a reserve of cash, stocks, shares, or whatever, whereas, of course, the individuals, just normal families, are under threat of losing their homes because they lose their livelihood.

So, there is that isolated bubble out there that aren't objecting to this because it's not really impacting them. I see them out in restaurants all the time. You know, you can see that this lockdown isn't really touching them.

Barry Nussbaum: Oh, absolutely. It's do as I say, not as I do, and oh, by the way, I hope the food delivery truck isn't late with my ice cream. Using the example of Nancy Pelosi.

Katie Hopkins: Right.

Barry Nussbaum: So, leave us with a nice feel-good story. You told me about this pub that you've heard about. I thought it was a delightful story. Go ahead.

Katie Hopkins: This is going to be my aim that we always leave with some uplifting parable. I went to my local pub with my husband, and as the closing time was coming near one by one, these elderly gentlemen came in with their little sticks, their little smart jackets, and their masks.

They came in, and they all sat around this large, if you can imagine, an old, old British pub table that can seat at least 12. They all took a chair. Those chairs, it seemed, were known. They were just chatting and updating, and you could see them all excited to be there to see each other. It turns out that they were elderly widow gentlemen from this small village.

They've been locked down, isolated, and alone. This delightful pub landlord that I know has told them that no one would touch them if they come to his pub. That they can sit there and have a drink or not, be among each other, spend time and that no one will trample them. It's become like a sort of gathering to me. That's the wisdom of a village, a gathering of the elders.

I think isn't that just a delight, amongst the rules and the nonsense humanity prevails. There are elderly gentlemen who are being treated in such a respectful manner by these beautiful people that I love. So, I was able to go up and just give them a big cheer and to thank the pub landlord that I love. I just don't know, but I think these are the stories that make us certain that we will prevail through this.

Barry Nussbaum: Well, that's a great story. I really appreciate you sharing it. I'm going to have our national director Anni Cyrus get an ATP mug that we can give to that proprietor to celebrate the fact that he values freedom and wants to protect the elderly. I really appreciate you sharing that story.

Katie Hopkins: Oh, thank you. Well, he said Barry actually, he came up when I was speaking to the gentleman, and he said, "I love your videos." So, Barry, you, and me, we're doing something right for him.

Barry Nussbaum: I love to hear it. The feedback has made my morning. I appreciate it. So, thanks, everybody, for joining us. Thanks to Katie Hopkins for coming on again all the way from London, England. For those of you in the United States who have not yet subscribed to our text message alert system, please take out your cell phones and text the message truth TRUTH to 88202. For ATP Report. I’m, Barry Nussbaum.

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